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glassjewel asked:

Hey Vicious Cosplay. Thank you for always posting and answering anything about cosplay. It's people like you that make the whole cosplay community fun and enjoyable. I was wondering if you have any tips on how to choose and match different types of fabric for cosplays. I've been wanting to cosplay for sometime, but with so many different fabrics, it's a little overwhelming on what goes better with what. Thank you for your time, and keep up with your awesome work!

vicious-cosplay:

Awww thank you! Now lets see if I can make this fabric question simple and easy as possible for someone new… It will be a wall of text, I’m sorry, but I highlighted each of the fabric types in case you take this into joanns or something!

  • First Rule of Cosplay: Costume Satin is a lie, and don’t ever touch it. The fabric, for as cheap as it is, is also very crappy, hard to iron, and looks awful. Don’t use it.
  • Solid Cottons are good for casual attires, as well as historical common clothing
  • White cottons are also good for dying! So if you can’t buy your color, you can probably dye it. Be sure to test before doing so.
  • Bottom-weight fabrics are also normally cottons but have more oomph to them than solid cottons like kona or others. These are good for pants, lining, corsets, ect ect. Go through these and certainly give them a feel and a tug if you need something sturdy
  • Denim fabric is self explanatory, but be sure you have denim thread and needles if you try to sew with this fabric! Please check youtube as working with denim material is difficult!
  • Satins come in different types: Matte or shiny, solid or crepe. Satins are big in the formal wear. Solid Mattes are good for solid colors that are more elegant than cottons, while shiny will give it a boost. Crepe is good if you want to add a little more texture to the fabric than just a solid front.
  • Silk fabrics are the upgrade of satin, but are far more flowy and light to it’s satin counterpart. Silk also comes in SEVERAL different styles- but tend to be very expensive!
  • Remember though: Shiny overall does not mean better! Accenting shiny fabrics with solid matte fabrics can really boost those details.
  • Jersey and Knit fabrics are stretch fabrics, good for t-shirts and other things that require stretching. 
  • Spandex is also stretchy fabric! They can come in 2-way or 4-way. Whats the difference? 2-way only stretches along x axis, while 4-way stretches both X and Y axis!
  • Polyester patterns are fabrics with designs! If you can get a pattern like the one you want, then go for it!
  • Brocades are good when you need a mixture of bling with patterns. Beware that brocade does fray very easily, so it will require something to back it if you’re working on anything with seams that are constantly stretched by body movement (like pants, hip areas, and arms)
  • Velvet and velveteen you know to the touch. Velveteen is the cheaper counterpart to velvet, which isn’t as soft but still has a very similar look. You can also get crushed velvet which has more texture, if that is the look you want. Velvet and velveteen are also heavy, so beware this when making attire for it.
  • Wool can be thick and heavy. This is especially good for making coats and jackets.
  • Along with wool you have suiting. Suiting fabrics can be polyester, cotton or wool. These will have the pinstripes and general feel of professional clothing like suits.
  • Know your sheers: Tule is net like and itchy, organza is somewhat shiny and still a little stiff, chiffon is flowy and elegant and light. Tule is great for petticoats to poof up a skirt, while chiffon is good for color overlays or sheer flowing fabrics.
  • My favorite lining? Posh. It’s soft, it’s thin, and it absorbs sweat very easily and cleans out nice.
  • Anti-static solid lining is good for keeping things off your legs, but it is not as anti-static as it promises
  • Interfacing is an internal not-really-fabric that you can use to stabilize fabric. It comes in different weights (feather-weight, medium, craft) which will give the stiffness, and some are fusible (so you can iron it to your fabric.) Always read the directions before using fusible and test on scrap fabric.

The best thing you can do to is look through your own wardrobe! Feel the fabric in your fingers, look on the label to see what it is. You’ll realize that there is a common form of lineage for what sort of materials goes into different types of clothing. Reading these labels can also help teach you how to wash these fabrics as well!

I hope that this list helped :D

melodiouse:

chomei:

this is the most inaccurate representation of how animals work ive ever seen

THANK YOU
I AM SO GLAD I WASNT THE ONLY ONE WHO NOTICED THIS

THIS IS IT. THIS IS THE PART I WAS TALKING ABOUT. THE ONE ON THE RIGHT IS SLIGHTLY MORE FORGIVABLE, BUT THE ONE ON THE LEFT, REN IS WALKING LIKE A CAMEL. LIKE, I LEARNED ABOUT 4-LEGGED WALK CYCLES IN MY FIRST SEMESTER OF ANIMATION GUYS. A LITTLE EFFORT PLEASE.

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